A Decade After Katrina, Can Philanthropy Make Black Lives Matter?

Updated: Jan 17, 2019

​Chronicle of Philanthropy op-ed, by Nat Chioke Williams, Executive Director of the Hill-Snowdon Foundation, on what philanthropy can do to make black lives matter.

MICHAEL B. THOMAS/ GETTY IMAGES

On Saturday, people from around the world will commemorate the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans. Although many people will tout the city’s recovery, few people in black working-class neighborhoods will be celebrating. After all, they have been mostly left behind.


But that is hardly the only poignant and painful reminder of the inequities facing blacks in America and how far the nation still must go to end them.


On August 4, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, the crowning achievement of the civil-rights movement, which was recently gutted by the Supreme Court.


Five days later, we recognized the one-year anniversary of the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., an attack that launched what is commonly known as the Black Lives Matter movement — a movement to assert the sanctity of black life, even as it is fueled by a wave of black deaths at the hands of police.


Read the Full Article

© 2018 by the Hill-Snowdon Foundation. Proudly created with Wix.com